Medieval stringed percussion instrument!

 
I first heard a hammered dulcimer (which someone told me was called a “hammerboard”) at Scarborough Faire, an annual Renaissance Festival by Waxahachie, Texas (south of Dallas) — when I was a teenager in the 1980’s. I remember hearing it from a distance, and following the delightful sound to its source. I felt like my blood had developed a new beat, more fluid and alive. THIS was an awesome sound, and most definitely FIT the medieval setting with people all dressed in costume of the day, jousts taking place on the grounds, and chessboards painted on a field with HUMAN chess pieces that fought mock sword battles to take over spaces. I never wanted to leave, lol. 😛

 
Dulcimer = dulcis (sweet) + melos (song) = sweet song… do you agree?
 

Here are some hammered dulcimers in a museum in Brussels, Belgium:

 
More on this topic:
Wikipedia
Smithsonian
Dusty Springs
Master Works

 


 

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